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  • Amelia Swilley Bingham

    Amelia Swilley Bingham

    A young woman home from college waiting tables in the family hotel dining room is spotted by a leading stage star who marries her and launches a career on Broadway. It all began in downtown Hicksville. Amelia Bingham’s stage career began in Hicksville, Ohio where her father owned the Swilley

     
  • Fifty Six facts About Hicksville Ohio in 1909

    Three large handle and lathe work mills with a combined value of $90,000, employing a large force of men. Three large planing mills and lumber yards A five thousand dollar stave and heading plant A ten thousand dollar tile, brick, and clay works A ten thousand dollar furniture and fine

     
  • Daeida Hartell Wilcox Beveridge

    Once described as “just a housewife” Daeida Hartell Wilcox Beveridge renamed a former fig farm and secured her place in Hollywood history. Born in Hicksville Ohio, Daeida was the daughter of farmers, Amelia and John Emerson Hartell. She attended private school in Hicksville before moving to Canton. Daeida married H.H.

     
  • The Huber Theater

    The Huber Theater

    Many inquires have been received concerning the Huber Theater, now Tremors. This partial article was published at the time of the buildings completion. It was regarded as one of the area’s grandest buildings By the greatest possible exertion was the new opera house ready for the grand opening this evening.

     
  • The Hicks Land Office

    The Land Office is one of the most important buildings in Defiance County. It is one of the few buildings left in Hicksville from the settlement days. The Land office symbolizes Hicksville’s emergence from the swamp. When Empraim Burwell was send to this area in 1836, he had orders to

     
  • Newsletter Digest

    Reprints of our most-requested newsletter articles Edith L. Smith’s Letter (undated) “Grandfather Henry Gilbert was a cattle drover. They followed the Yellowstone Trail – routes 2 and 37. He said an Antwerp gang stole the cannon at the corner of Main and High Sts. The Hicksville gang got it back.

     
  • Hart’s All- Girl Band

    Hart’s All- Girl Band

    HART’S ALL-GIRL BAND ‘As we passed through Louisville, I noticed a tremendous crowd lined up on the depot platform. Nothing in particular caught my attention until someone in the crowd shouted “there they are; there they are; I found out later that we were a littlemore famous than we thought

     
  • Boysband

    STRIKE UP THE BAND!! The Hickville Centennial Book gave this contemporary description of Hart’s Boys Band: “It is in a class by itself”. The boys feast in the classics and frolic with the ditties. No band exceeds Hart’s in tone, harmony, or volume. Their appearance is strikingly beautiful, keeping with

     
 
 
 
 
 
 
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